Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment https://ecozona.eu/ Journal of Literature, Culture and the Environment Universidad de Alcalá en-US Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2171-9594 <p>Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:<br><br>a) Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a&nbsp;<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/" target="_new">Creative Commons Attribution License</a>&nbsp;that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal (CC BY-NC for articles and CC BY-NC-ND for creative work, unless author requests otherwise.</p> <p>b) Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.</p> <p>c) Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See <a href="http://opcit.eprints.org/oacitation-biblio.html" target="_new">The Effect of Open Access</a>).</p> Ecozon@ Editorial 11.1 https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3663 <p>Editorial for <em>Ecozon@ </em>11.1.</p> Axel Goodbody Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-04-06 2020-04-06 11 1 i iv 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3663 Cultures of Climate. On Bodies and Atmospheres in Modern Fiction: An Introduction https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3639 <p>Introduction.</p> Solvejg Nitzke Eva Horn Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-31 2020-03-31 11 1 1 8 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3639 Émile Zola’s Climate History of the Second Empire https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3181 <p><span lang="EN-US">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This article looks at Émile Zola’s novel cycle <em>Les Rougon-Macquart&nbsp;</em>and argues that it describes its subject, the Second Empire, as a warming climate tending toward climate catastrophe. Zola’s affinity to the notion of climate is shown to be linked to his poetic employment of the concept of ‘milieu’, inspired by Hippolyte Taine. Close readings of selected passages from the&nbsp;<em>Rougon-Macquart&nbsp;</em>are used to work out the climatic difference between ‘the old’ and ‘the new Paris’, and the process of warming that characterises the Second Empire. Octave Mouret’s department store holds a special place in the article, as it is analysed through what the article suggests calling a ‘meteorotopos’: a location of intensified climatic conditions that accounts for an increased interaction between human and non-human actors. The department store is also one of the many sites in the novel cycle that locally prefigure the ‘global’ climate catastrophe of Paris burning, in which the Second Empire perishes.</span></p> Johannes Ungelenk Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-12 2020-03-12 11 1 9 26 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3181 Talking about the Weather. Roland Barthes on Climate, Everydayness, the Feeling of Being, and Poetics https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3190 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The paper reads Rolands Barthes’ considerations on weather and climate in his last lecture cycle <em>La Préparation du Roman </em>by contextualizing its brief remarks with his previous discussions on this topic. Barthes develops a phenomenological concept of climate, showing how experiences of place across the seasons shape certain habits. These manifest in expectations, perceptions, daily routines, and language. However, his particular interest is devoted to the question of how an existential experience of weather in its contingency can be regained. Furthermore, he investigates how poetry tries to capture the uniqueness and singularity of respective weather appearances against the patterns and narratives of the climate sedimented in the language system.</p> Urs Buettner Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-22 2020-03-22 11 1 27 42 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3190 Nothing but Catastrophes? Climate Change as a Challenge to the Utopian Tradition https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3189 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Current political debates on climate are permeated by apocalyptical thinking. Movements like Fridays for Future and Exitinction Rebellion, too, are shaped by this tradition—positive visions, on the other hand, utopian images of a sustainable society remain abstract and rarely are at the forefront of public debates. I want to argue that the actualization and continuation of utopian literature offers potentials for alternative constructions of the future. I want to pursue the question how and whether literary utopias can provide moments of a better life in a future changed climate. I will (1) look at recent academic discussions of the so-called “Cli-Fi“-boom. Particularly its temporal dimensions prove to be a significant barrier for its literary depiction. However, I will show (2), the versatility of literary utopia is caused precisely by its capacity to model time. Against this backdrop, I will (3) analyze Kim Stanley Robinson’s <em>New York 2140</em>. A text which continues the utopian tradition against the backdrop of the current debate on climate change and the Anthropocene. I aim to follow which strategies the novel uses in order to connect individual, social and climatic levels of time. Finally, (4) I will discuss the significance of a critical reflection of the dominance of apocalyptic thinking in current political debates about climate: The fixation on potential destruction and abstract goals of reduction holds the danger of frustration and a shift to cynicism.</p> Emanuel Herold Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-12 2020-03-12 11 1 43 62 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3189 Hatred of the Earth, Climate Change, and the Dreams of Post-Planetary Culture https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3188 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This text examines the effects of climate change on cultural ideas regarding the colonization of space. More specifically, this paper explores the ways which the looming danger of climate catastrophe has fueled the growth of post-planetary culture: a culture that dreams of a human destiny beyond the Earth. It takes as its object both science fiction texts and non-fiction futurological pronouncements by scientists and entrepreneurs. What emerges from this study is the observation that unlike climate skeptics, post-planetarists believe that climate change is real. Yet like climate skeptics, they subordinate climate action to other priorities, putting the construction of a means of escaping this planet above climate action. But why do these post-planetarists wish to fly? Via a close reading of David Brin’s <em>Earth</em>, we argue that one of the key characteristics of post-planetary culture is a feeling of hatred and alienation towards the Earth. This hatred is both re-enforced by the ravages of climate change even as it contributes to this destruction by blocking post-planetarists from whole-heartedly engaging in climate action. In order to illustrate an antidote to this pathological cultural reaction to our current crisis, I present a close reading Kim Stanley Robinson’s <em>Aurora</em>, exploring how this text is both a critique of post-planetarism and a guide to renewing our love for the Earth.</p> Brad Tabas Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-04-01 2020-04-01 11 1 63 79 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3188 The Pathogenesis of the Modern Climate https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3179 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This article offers an exploratory semantic analysis of the concept of climate through the lens of Reinhart Koselleck’s theory of historical semantics. After discussing reasons for its absence in Koselleck’s own scholarly investigations into the semantics of modernity, the article argues that the word climate acquired the properties of a freestanding concept in the course of the eighteenth century. The steep rise in the word’s relative frequency at that time is explained in terms of its relevance to contemporary perceptions of time, and more particularly the rise of the progress narrative as a driver of human-made history. The article equally traces the concept’s decline in the course of the nineteenth century by pointing to developments in the sciences and the secularization of eschatology. Finally, the article reflects on the concept’s revival since the latter half of the twentieth century. Focusing specifically on the recent emergence of collocations such as “climate crisis,” the article argues that, in its orientation towards an open future, climate change communication reveals its reliance on the temporal framework of accelerating progress that it at the same time holds responsible for our warming planet. The article concludes with a plea to pay closer attention to the temporal presuppositions underlying climate change communication.&nbsp;</p> Michael Boyden Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-08 2020-03-08 11 1 80 98 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3179 Scaling High Places. Mountaineering Narratives as Climatological Tales https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3192 <p>Christoph Ransmayr’s 2006 novel <em>Der fliegende Berg</em> and Thomas Glavinic’s <em>Das größere Wunder</em> (published in 2013) confront very different ideas of mountaineering. Glavinic’s protagonist Jonas joins a commercial expedition to summit the world’s highest mountain. These highly criticized commercial endeavors are the opposite of Ransmayr’s scenario in which two brothers, Patrick and Liam, embark on a journey to a mythical peak – the last Himalayan mountain no one has ever summited before. The commercial sporting extravaganza and the ultimate independent adventure represent two extremes of a practice aimed at producing intense physical encounters with nature. Both novels confront the possibility of such encounters with an account of the life of their protagonists within a thoroughly modern world. In aligning biography with the ascent of the respective peak, the narratives present themselves as mediations between personal and planetary scales. Climate, thus, is not only present as an obstacle to overcome, but as a narrative device negotiating increasingly precarious relationships between humans and nature. In comparison with non-fictional mountaineering accounts these narratives reveal an understanding of climate which is not exhausted in a “weather-biased understanding of the atmosphere” (Fleming/Jankovic 2). Instead they resurrect apparently discarded notions of climate as a local and bodily entity. Using Fleming/Jankovic’s concept of <em>Klima</em> – an understanding of climate which combines natural and cultural facts – this paper investigates the methodological and narrative aspects of scaling, acclimatization and high-altitude in order to unearth the myth underlying these climatological tales and their (possibly) productive and destructive effects on current discourses on human-nature-relationships in the Anthropocene.</p> Solvejg Nitzke Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-11 2020-03-11 11 1 99 114 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3192 “She Moves Through Deep Corridors”: Mobility and Settler Colonialism in Sharon Doubiago’s Proletarian Eco-Epic Hard Country https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3297 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; This article analyzes Sharon Doubiago’s American long poem <em>Hard Country </em>(1982) from the joined perspectives of ecocriticism and mobility studies. It argues that <em>Hard Country </em>is a proletarian eco-epic that rethinks human-nature relations from a working-class perspective shaped by different kinds of (im)mobility. In my analysis, I show how the text revises the American epic tradition by foregrounding working-class people’s desire for meaningful relationships to place in light of histories of environmental injustice and displacement. Doubiago’s text promotes traditional place-based notions of belonging, but it also challenges ideas about what kind of sense of place can be environmentally suggestive. In doing so, it allows for the emergence of a proletarian “ecopoetics of mobility” (Gerhardt) that emphasizes the bodily experiences of Doubiago’s mobile narrator as well as U.S.-American histories and cultures of mobility. Among these cultures of mobility, settler colonialism stands out as a system of violent domination and form of environmental injustice (Whyte) that calls into question working-class people’s desire to move or settle on dispossessed indigenous lands. As such, settler colonialism poses a challenge to Doubiago’s proletarian ecopoetics of mobility, which must engage with the fact that white working-class people in the United States have always been perpetrators as well as victims of both environmental and mobility injustice.</p> Judith Rauscher Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-31 2020-03-31 11 1 115 133 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3297 Thinking Globally, Acting Locally: Ecology and Human Rights in Gioconda Belli’s Waslala https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3242 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Gioconda Belli’s futuristic novel <em>Waslala</em> reveals the many tensions that arise when one explores human rights within a context of planetary ecological crisis. While the novel criticizes human exploitation of natural resources and the resultant differential development and economic inequality, at the same time it affirms access to and control of resources as a fundamental human right. Using Steve Stern and Scott Straus’s framework of the “human rights paradox” and Jason Moore’s description of the “Capitalocene,” I argue that <em>Waslala</em> demonstrates two fundamental tensions between human rights and environmental issues. First, the novel shows how attention to the universal principles of global ecological balance may undermine the human rights of individuals constrained by geography or economic class. Second, it demonstrates how the human right to property is implicated in global ecological crisis. Although <em>Waslala</em> purports to privilege human rights over ecological concerns, at the same time it highlights the impossibility of separating the two, prompting a rethinking of the definition and practice of human rights within the context of global ecology.</p> Nancy Gates Madsen Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-22 2020-03-22 11 1 134 151 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3242 Landscapes of Extraction and the Memories of Extinction in Patricio Guzmán’s Nostalgia de la luz and El botón de nácar https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3325 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Focusing on Guzmán's essay films <em>Nostalgia de la luz</em> (2010) and <em>El botón de nácar</em> (2015), in this article I argue that the ambiguity between reference and abstraction that pervades the visual representation of landscape in late capitalism offers a productive way to map out the processes of extinction caused by continual histories of extraction. This ambiguity not only reveals the limits of the landscape-form to convey the degradation of nature, but also the progressive disappearance of the human subject from the center of history in such spaces where capital seeks time and time again to resolve its internal contradictions through new forms of resource extraction. In this fashion, Guzmán’s totalizing aspiration to represent the historical, archaeological, and even cosmological pasts through the landscapes of the Atacama Desert and Patagonia becomes a way to explain how capital has moved from the human to the planetary, which entails a larger alteration of ecological metabolism and transforms extinction into the only historical horizon. I conclude that the memory of past processes of extraction and extinction inscribed in these landscapes can also function as a prolepsis of a future without us, thus presenting an opportunity to reactivate the subject’s historical potential to change the way we relate to nature.</p> J. Sebastián Figueroa Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-21 2020-03-21 11 1 152 169 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3325 Editorial https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3660 <p>This is the editorial for the Creative Writing and Arts of Ecozon@ 11.1 (Spring 2020).</p> Damiano Benvegnù Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-31 2020-03-31 11 1 170 173 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3660 Nimbus https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3651 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The <em>Nimbus</em> works present a transitory moment of presence in a specific location. They can be interpreted as a sign of loss or becoming, or just as a a fragment from a classical painting. People have always had a strong metaphysical connection to clouds and through time have projected many ideas on them. <br>Smilde is interested in the temporary aspect of the work. It's there for a few seconds before they fall apart again. The physical aspect is really important but the work in the end only exists as a photograph. The photo functions as a document of something that happened on a specific location and is now gone.</p> Berndnaut Smilde Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-24 2020-03-24 11 1 174 177 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3651 Periodic Poetry https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3233 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Three English poems and one in German - ecopoetry - using chemical element symbols for the complete text and to symbolize pollution and climate change.</p> Alex Dreppec Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-24 2020-03-24 11 1 178 185 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3233 Poems https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3017 <p>Poems.</p> Karen Poppy Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-24 2020-03-24 11 1 186 187 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3017 More Virulent Than Disease https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3191 <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; “More Virulent than Disease” is a chapter from the historical novel, <em>Painted Butterflies</em>. This excerpt is written through the voice of Santiago Ramon y Cajal (1852 – 1934), Nobel Prize Winner, who is credited with being “The Father of Modern Neuroscience.” In this piece, Santiago is in his mid-twenties recounting the four years since his return from the Separatist War in Cuba (Ten Years War), where he served as a head physician in a remote jungle hospital. Here, he ruminates about his recovery from illnesses which he acquired in the tropics, from which he barely survived. His hopefulness, his need for artistic expression, his passion for the natural world and the courage he observed from others brought Santiago through one of the darkest periods of his life. &nbsp;<em>Painted Butterflies</em> follows the life and scientific work of Santiago Ramon y Cajal through his journal entries. His story is expressed through his 19<sup>th</sup> century lens, but is also seen through the eyes of a modern, fictional neuroscientist, Rebecca Calhoun, who is navigating graduate school in the United States. Across two centuries and continents, these scientists discover themselves and what drives their passions for living deeply and the excitement of discovery. When Santiago’s journal falls mysteriously into Rebecca’s hands, they become connected by a scientific theory, spurned by Santiago’s prescience into how memory works. As if Santiago is whispering in her ear, Rebecca pursues her idea on how to enhance the brain’s capacity for memory (and succeeds), but there is a caveat that takes her findings to an unexpected and more personal place.</p> Stephanie Gage Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-24 2020-03-24 11 1 188 191 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3191 New Directions in African American Ecocriticism https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3262 <p>Review essay.</p> Matthias Klestil Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-02-27 2020-02-27 11 1 192 196 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3262 Book Review of Bad Environmentalism: Irony and Irreverance in the Ecological Age https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3266 <p>Book review.</p> Katie Frances Ritson Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-02-27 2020-02-27 11 1 197 198 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3266 Book review of Allegories of the Anthropocene https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3625 <p>Book review.</p> Giulia Champion Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-26 2020-03-26 11 1 199 200 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3625 Book Review of Climate and Literature https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3624 <p>Book review.</p> Leonardo Nolé Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-22 2020-03-22 11 1 201 203 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3624 Book Review of Climate and Crises: Magical Realism as Environmental Discourse https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3265 <p>Book review<em>.</em></p> Jessica Maufort Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-02-28 2020-02-28 11 1 204 206 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3265 Book Review of Future Remains. A Cabinet of Curiosities for the Anthropocene https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3263 <p>Book review.</p> Solvejg Nitzke Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-02-27 2020-02-27 11 1 207 209 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3263 Book Review of Techno-Thoreau: Aesthetics, Ecology and the Capitalocene https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3523 <p>Book review.</p> Başak Ağın Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-03-05 2020-03-05 11 1 210 212 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3523 Credits 11.1 https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3669 <p>Credits 11.1</p> Irene Sanz Alonso Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-04-02 2020-04-02 11 1 213 216 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3669 Whole Issue https://ecozona.eu/article/view/3709 Lorraine Kerslake Copyright (c) 2020 Ecozon@: European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment 2020-04-28 2020-04-28 11 1 i 216 10.37536/ECOZONA.2020.11.1.3709